03 November 2016 Humanitarian Update
IOM South Sudan Humanitarian Update #71
07 October 2016 Humanitarian Update
IOM South Sudan Humanitarian Update #70

Programmes

Camp Coordination and Camp Management (CCCM)
Logistics
Migration Health
Migration Management
Psychosocial Support
Rapid Response Fund (RRF)
Shelter/Non-Food Items (NFI)
Transition and Recovery
Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH)

Camp Coordination and Camp Management (CCCM)

As part of the global cluster system, the CCCM Cluster facilitates the delivery of life-saving services to internally displaced persons (IDPs) sheltering in displacement sites throughout South Sudan. IOM and the UN High Commissioner for Refugees co-lead the CCCM Cluster, in coordination with the Agency for Technical Cooperation and Development.

IOM also serves as the CCCM State Focal Point in Jonglei, Upper Nile, Warrap and Western Bahr el Ghazal states. As State Focal Point, IOM coordinates the CCCM response across the state and works with a network of County Focal Points to gather data on displacement and inform response activities.

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Logistics

Conflict and seasonal hazards make logistics a complicated undertaking in South Sudan, with more than 600,000 square kilometres of land area and one of the least-developed road networks in the world. In addition, more than 60 per cent of the country is cut-off from road travel during the rainy season, and violence-related access constraints often hinder logistics activities.

To help relief agencies deliver in this context, IOM supports logistics operations across South Sudan through the Common-Transport Service (CTS). The CTS is a free-for-user service that transports humanitarian supplies to key operational areas and field locations to help partners provide assistance to vulnerable populations.

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Migration Health

Decades of war in South Sudan have led to a virtual collapse of the country’s health care system and led to some of the worst key health indicators globally, with more than 4.6 million people in need of health assistance in 2015.

IOM health initiatives are guided by the 61st World Health Assembly (WHA) Resolution 61.17 on the Health of Migrants that aims to improve the well-being of migrants, mobile populations and communities affected by migration by responding to their health needs throughout all phases of the migration process. Programmes cover a range of issues, including emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, malaria and sexually transmitted infections, including HIV.

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Migration Management

IOM is committed to promoting humane and orderly movement of people across borders through regulating migration and protecting migrants within the borders of a state. In South Sudan, IOM works closely with the government, humanitarian and development partners, and migrants to improve migration management. IOM offers policy guidance, supports institutional capacity building, and works to improve immigration and border management. In addition, IOM supports assisted voluntary return (AVR) and provides support to vulnerable migrants and migrants caught in crisis. IOM South Sudan receives technical guidance and support from IOM Headquarters in Geneva and Regional Office in Nairobi, as well as IOM’s African Capacity Building Center (ACBC) in Tanzania.

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Psychosocial Support

With the crisis in South Sudan well into its second year, the psychosocial impact of the conflict persists. The experiences of violence, displacement and confinement among internally displaced persons (IDPs) have contributed to community wide emotional distress.

IOM manages one of the only programmes in South Sudan responding to these needs, providing psychosocial support to IDPs, with a focusing on youth and adults, at the UN protection of civilians (PoC) site in Bor, Jonglei State, where approximately 2,300 people continue to seek protection today. Many of these IDPs experience psychosocial suffering, very often linked to the conditions of living in the confinement of a PoC site.

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Rapid Response Fund (RRF)

The RRF supports national and international non-governmental organisations (NGOs) to respond to natural and man-made disasters in South Sudan and Abyei Area. IOM, in close collaboration with USAID’s Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (USAID/OFDA), supports partner organizations that are working in South Sudan and Abyei and have the capacity to swiftly implement specific emergency interventions that respond to the immediate needs of affected populations.

The RRF prioritizes activities that do not last for more than three months but will also consider longer implementation periods should there be a clear need.

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Shelter/Non-Food Items (NFI)

IOM implements and coordinates lifesaving shelter and NFI operations across South Sudan to provide protection, mitigate health risks and help restore dignity to crisis- and disaster-affected populations.

Since the crisis erupted in December 2013, IOM has deployed more than 50 mobile response team operations to distribute shelter and relief materials, conduct assessments, and register households for assistance.

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Transition and Recovery

IOM’s Transition and Recovery Unit develops programmes that address the root causes of instability and conflict in South Sudan through community based peace building and conflict mitigation strategies.

Current transition and recovery oriented programmes promote dialogue, boost local economies by facilitating trade and income-generation projects, construct/rehabilitate key infrastructure and support the dissemination of peace messages and non‐biased reporting through mass media.

IOM’s Transition and Recovery Unit has an operating budget of $22 million, with activities ongoing in Abyei Area* and Jonglei, Northern Bahr el Ghazal, Western Bahr el Ghazal and Warrap states, as well as the Greater Pibor Administrative Area.

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Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH)

IOM is supporting life-saving WASH operations across South Sudan, where the UN estimates that as many as 6.4 million people are in need of WASH assistance.

IOM WASH is setting up, rehabilitating and operating water systems in UN protection of civilian (PoC) sites and other locations to ensure that crisis-affected populations have sustainable access to safe drinking water. IOM also establishes and maintains emergency latrines and other sanitation facilities to ensure access to safe and hygienic living environments.

To help mitigate the spread of disease and build capacity among crisis-affected communities, IOM disseminates hygiene messages and supports implementation of hygiene promotion events and campaigns in PoC sites and other locations across the country.

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Displacement Tracking and Monitoring

The Displacement Tracking and Monitoring (DTM) Unit of IOM South Sudan is mandated to coordinate the Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) and carry out biometric registration, Movement Trend Tracking and Village Assessment Surveys (VAS). The DTM Unit tracks, collects and stores data on internally displaced populations across South Sudan while also monitoring site conditions. Learn More
Registration

IOM began Biometric Registration of internally displaced persons (IDPs) in June of 2014. The process includes fingerprinting of all household members and photographing young children and babies whose fingerprints are not recordable. 

Displacement Tracking Matrix

 The DTM is a Camp Coordination and Camp Management Cluster tool developed by IOM and used to gather baseline information on IDPs and their conditions in the location in which they have temporarily settled. 

Returnees

Since August 2007, IOM has tracked and registered returnees and IDPs in South Sudan. 

Village Assessment Survey

VAS is a comprehensive data for South Sudan that has informed humanitarian and development responses since 2007. VAS provides detailed information on access to basic services, infrastructure and other key indicators to ensure that reintegration programmes are developed and implemented on a foundation of accurate information. 

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